Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again

 — Maxime Rossi

16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019
Exhibition view
Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again
16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019 , Galerie Allen
Exhibition view
Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again
16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019 , Galerie Allen
Exhibition view
Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again
16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019 , Galerie Allen
Exhibition view
Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again
16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019 , Galerie Allen
Exhibition view
Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again
16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019 , Galerie Allen
Exhibition view
Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again
16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019 , Galerie Allen
Exhibition view
Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again
16th January, 2019 — 2nd March, 2019 , Galerie Allen
Maxime Rossi
Christmas on Earth Continued, 2017-2019
4 acoustic prisms, 6 channels sound installation and behavioral algorithm, computer
variable dimensions, infinite duration
Photo: Aurélien Mole
courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris
Maxime Rossi
Maxime Rossi
Even after they had fallen silent in the twinkling blue velvet of night, faint signals could be heard from distant stars: dirty planet, we gotta go, 2019
Tiffany glass, steel, painting
126 x 163 x 3 cm
Photo : Aurélien Mole
courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris
Maxime Rossi
Maxime Rossi
Nicotiana alata, 2019
Night blooming plant, plaster and silicon mold
Photo : Aurélien Mole
courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris
Maxime Rossi
Maxime Rossi
Mix tapes, 2019
Raincoat, silkscreened on cotton and gold silk lamé, mixtapes inserted into pockets
137 x 70 x 14 cm
Photo : Aurélien Mole
courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris
Maxime Rossi
Maxime Rossi
Dirty Songs, 2019
Vintage inflatable Dumbo, video on iPad, Sony mdr7506
50 x 50 x 23 cm
Photo : Aurélien Mole
courtesy of the artist and Galerie Allen, Paris
Maxime Rossi

Press release

ENGLISH :
(Français ci-dessous)

All that was left of my big brother was a bunch heavy rock mixtapes he had made in the late 80s, with hand made covers cut from magazines. I also got an empty metal box of Camel tobacco, that smelled like the wallpaper covering the walls of his room. Like the blast of loud music that was often playing in his room, I only remember the muffled vibrations passing through our common wall, but no melodies. Maybe it has something to do with the “gong effect” of the pioneer of modern mime, Etienne Decroux, the continuous movement of a sound in his absence, through memory.[1]

Maxime Rossi’s exhibition Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again is a multi-layered aural and visceral experience that has evolved from several exhibitions by Maxime Rossi – at Musée régional d’art contemporain Occitanie, Serignan; Galerie Edouard Manet, Gennevilliers and Fondation Fiminco – into an incredibly dense, complex and complete series of artworks. Conceived when the artist discovered a declassified FBI document outlining the investigation into the Kingsmen’s 1963 rock-and-roll record Louie Louie, the exhibition distills a time of puritanism and paranoia. Edgar J. Hoover, the fearsome director of the FBI, whose suspicious nature imagined the lyrics as obscene and pornographic had his federal agents spend months deconstructing the song searching for encrypted messages and developing many imaginary and artful re-interpretations of the hit song. The case of the non-existent obscenity (any confusion is easily resolved if you listen to the original lyrics) ended without prosecution. Ironically overlooked, the drummer yells “Fuck” when he drops his stick at the 0:54 mark.
 
A perfect primary source for Rossi where the surreal, the revised, the collaged and modern music combine, the artist has formalised the evidence into an intensely layered exhibition around an artwork that uses artificial intelligence, behavioural algorithms and deep learning to create an ever evolving sound piece. Inspired by Raga (literally “colouring, tingeing, dyeing”) music from India and Pakistan that structures a melodic framework as a basis for improvisation, Rossi’s algorithm performs and evolves constantly as it reacts to the seasons, hour of the day and mood of the artwork’s location. Beginning with this impetus, Rossi employs the sound files of the psychedelic rock record he produced in 2017 as an artwork[2] with historical members of varying British groups such as Phil Minton, David Toop, Steve Beresford, Evan Parker and the 4 times Grammy award-winning artistic director Tom Recchion. The artist built the computer program that is connected to wi-fi and registers meteorologic information to arrange musical and lyrical passages while changing the tone, register, speed and melody according to the real-time data.

A second data chart of pre-recorded orgasm phases is incorporated to draw a parallel with climate change, incorporating humidity, temperature, and air pressure. “Considering the tongue as a blossoming sex organ”[3], Rossi uses the lyrical content of the soundscape to inform the “emotional libidinal structure”[4] of the AI algorithm. The augmentation of the singer’s voice informs a new pattern of speech: a flowery language, unadorned, oddly adolescent, obscene and narcissistic that mimics the blooming curves of ascension, climax and descent that we may see as questioning a perceived obscenity found in nature.

This melodic score meets our ears through prismatic speakers that diffract the sound at varying angles not unlike an optical prism deflects light into colours. This technology, still in a stage of theoretical development and not widely available, emits four signals (one for each season) through their unconventional forms beautifully rendered as transparent acrylic sculptures suspended from the ceiling.

Merging onto the walls is the lyrical component of the sound score found in the unrealised script for artist/film director Barbara Rubin’s (American 1945 – 1980) Christmas on Earth Continued from the late sixties. Close to Ginsberg’s circle, Warhol’s factory, Jonas Mekas and others of the avant-garde, her films have been called “sub-sub-sub-underground”[5] and “among the most radical ever made”[6]. Her 1963 film titled Christmas on Earth (titled after a line in Arthur Rimbaud’s poem A Season in Hell) depicts a sensory feast in two 16mm films projected one upon the other, explicit sexual content and whatever the viewer had playing on AM radio. IMDB calls it “performance art film about genital worshipping”[7]. Her sequel would have included some of the period’s most important collaborators and the cast and crew list become the material for the singers improvised lyrics.

The title of the Barbara Rubin counter-culture script was co-opted for the rock festival happening in London around the same time, sadly remembered as the last important concert that Syd Barret played with Pink Floyd. During this concert the band played a 30-minute rambling improvisation of Louie Louie. This epic financial failure of a concert due to permit problems, biting winter weather and a lack of publicity, was soon dubbed “the last gasp of the British underground scene”. Rossi would later use a photo taken at the festival by his collaborator David Toop for the cover of their album Dirty Songs.

Next to a certain paranoia, the concept of “blooming” becomes an important theme in the exhibition as we see this action running through the varying stages of orgasms, weather and emotional moods, perfectly represented by a single plant in an artist-made vase. A Night-blooming Cereus Jasmin that reverses the cycle of most known plants by blossoming at night to release its “empty cigarette pack” scent before retreating during the day. Its temperament alludes to the, mostly accepted, phasing of sex and rock-and-roll being activities of the night. As if alluding to the perversity of these activities, the flower will hide during the galleries opening hours.

In the very centre of the gallery is a large metal sculpture framing exquisite artisanal stained glass panels. Lifting text from the record sleeve of Dirty Songs the sculpture reads as meandering concrete poetry.

Even after they had fallen silent in the twinkling
blue velvet of night, faint signals could be heard
from distant stars: dirty planet, we gotta go.

The psychedelic and op art aesthetic casts the room in varying blue and purple hues echoing the colour charts of the orgasm data we are unconsciously, but invariably, hearing. Conveniently exhibited in the dead of winter the piece elicits a soft-nod to Seasonal Affective Disorder (one must love the acronym SAD).

The exhibition, in formidable Maxime Rossi style, is an intense and heavily loaded sensual experience thats counter-culture source material make it a heightened trip though a multiplicity of rich source material. Its continually generating algorithm only escalates this layering and collaging as if an aural game of cadavres exquis played by the most important underground participants of a post-peace period.

1 Artist’s statement, 2018
Ref Etienne Decroux: The Paper Canoe: A Guide to Theatre Anthropology. Barba, Eugenio, 1994
2 Maxime Rossi artwork titled Dirty Songs, 2017. Audika Records (ASCP)
3-4 in conversation with the author, December 2018
5 Johan Kugelberg, “Barbara Rubin: Christmas on Earth”. The Brooklyn Rail. 5 February, 2013 https://brooklynrail.org/2013/02/artseen/barbara-rubin-christmas-on-earth
6 Klarl, Joseph. “Barbara Rubin: Christmas on Earth”. The Brooklyn Rail. 5 February, 2013. https://brooklynrail.org/2013/02/artseen/barbara-rubin-christmas-on-earth
7 https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0138361/?ref_=adv_li_tt




 


FRANÇAIS :

Tout ce qu’il me reste de mon grand frère se résume principalement à un ensemble de compilations rock enregistrées à la fin des années 80 sur des cassettes aux couvertures faites main, directement découpées dans des magazines de Heavy Metal. J’ai également récupéré une boîte vide en métal de tabac Camel, dont l’odeur imprégnait la paille de riz qui tapissait sa chambre. De la musique à plein volume souvent jouée sur sa chaîne, je ne me souviens que de l’explosion de sourdes vibrations traversant notre mur mitoyen, sans la mélodie. Peut-être que cela a avoir avec « l’effet gong » du premier mime moderne Etienne Decroux. Comme un écho qui persiste, le mouvement est fini mais continu.[1]

L’exposition de Maxime Rossi, Christmas on Earth Continued Again and Again, est une expérience auditive et viscérale dont les strates se déploient depuis plusieurs expositions - au Musée régional d’art contemporain Occitanie, Sérignan ; à la Galerie Edouard Manet, Gennevilliers et à la Fondation Fiminco, Romainville - en une série d’oeuvres particulièrement denses et complexes. Le projet élaboré à partir d’un document désormais public du FBI qui avait ouvert une enquête sur l’enregistrement du hit Louie Louie (1963) des Kingsmen’s, distille le parfum d’une époque de puritanisme et de paranoïa bureaucratique. La nature suspicieuse d’Edgar J. Hoover, le redoutable directeur du FBI, lui fit imaginer des paroles obscènes et pornographiques. Il employa ses agents fédéraux plusieurs mois pour décomposer la musique, à la recherche de messages cryptés et développant plusieurs réinterprétations fictives ou controversées du tube. Dans cette affaire d’obscénité imaginaire, toute confusion est aisément résolue si l’on écoute attentivement les paroles originales. Elle fut classée sans suite. Le juron “Fuck”, à l’origine de la controverse, que le batteur laissa échapper en même temps qu’une baguette à la 54ème seconde de l’enregistrement studio, resta ironiquement négligé par l’enquête.

Comme une plante qui porte ses fruits alors qu’elle meurt, les débris surréalistes de cette enquête sauvage influencent l’exposition dirigée par une intelligence artificielle. Des algorithmes comportementaux et un apprentissage profond contrôlent une pièce sonore en perpétuelle évolution. Inspiré du Raga, une gamme mélodique servant à l’improvisation dans la musique indienne et pakistanaise, l’algorithme harmonise et évolue inlassablement en fonction des saisons, des heures du jour et du climat du lieu de monstration. Entrainés par cette dynamique, les éléments sonores du disque de rock psychédélique Dirty Songs[2] composent une installation immersive qui rassemble des membres historiques de divers groupes britanniques tels que Phil Minton, David Toop, Steve Beresford, Evan Parker et le directeur artistique aux quatre Grammy awards, Tom Recchion. Une intelligence artificielle, utilisant un algorithme connecté à la Wi-Fi de la galerie, transcrit les informations météorologiques prélevées en temps réel, suivant sa localisation parisienne. Le système établi permet de mixer à l’infini les passages musicaux et de générer la propre langue du groupe, tout en modifiant le genre, l’âge et la personnalité du chanteur. Une seconde base de données préenregistrées, injecte en parallèle des phases d’orgasmes qui suivent les changements climatiques, incluant l’humidité, la température et la pression de l’air pour paramétrer « la langue du chanteur comme un organe sexuel »[3]. La “structure libidinale”[4] de l’algorithme module le conduit vocal de Phil Minton, dont la voix ainsi augmentée inspire un chant fleuri, informel, curieusement adolescent, obscène et narcissique. Cet apprentissage de la langue, calé sur une symétrie entre la floraison au fil des saisons et l’épanouissement de l’orgasme suivi de sa fanaison, questionne la notion d’obscénité perçue dans la nature.

La musique nous parvient grâce à des prismes acoustiques qui diffractent les fréquences sonores sous différents angles, de la même manière qu’un prisme optique diffracte la lumière en un spectre de couleurs. Cette technologie, toujours au stade de développement en laboratoire, émet quatre signaux (un pour chaque saison) au travers de prototypes atypiques et séduisants, fraisés en acrylique transparent et suspendus au plafond.

Le texte ayant permis l’apprentissage du langage par le programme informatique a été prélevé dans le script du film non réalisé Christmas on Earth Continued (1966) par la réalisatrice américaine Barbara Rubin (1945-1980). Proche de Ginsberg, de la Factory de Warhol, de Jonas Mekas et d’autres artistes d’avant-garde, ses films ont été qualifiés de « sub-sub-sub-underground »[5] et « parmi les plus radicaux jamais réalisés »[6]. Son film Christmas on Earth de 1963 tire son titre d’un vers du poème d’Arthur Rimbaud, Une saison en enfer, pour illustrer une orgie sensorielle dans deux films 16mm au contenu sexuel explicite, projetés l’un sur l’autre. La transmission en direct d’une radio AM composait la bande-son du film lors des projections. IMDB le qualifiera de « film d’art-performatif sur le culte génital »[7]. Cette suite, au casting rêvé qui aurait inclus certaines des plus importantes figures de l’époque, va nourrir la base de données vocales du programme.

Le titre du script de Barbara Rubin, caractéristique de la contre-culture de l’époque, fut récupéré par un festival de rock éponyme ayant eu lieu à Londres au même moment. Tristement connu comme étant le dernier concert important de Syd Barret avec les Pink Floyd, le groupe y interpréta une improvisation décousue de Louie Louie durant 30 minutes. L’échec financier du festival en raison de problèmes d’autorisations, des rudes conditions hivernales et d’un manque de publicité, a rapidement été surnommé “dernier souffle de la scène underground britannique”. David Toop proposera plus tard une photo qu’il avait lui-même prise au festival, pour la couverture de l’album Dirty Songs.

L’épanouissement et la floraison deviennent un thème important au sein de l’exposition, rythmé par les phases de l’orgasme, du changement climatique et du climat politique propice à une certaine paranoïa. Le jasmin bâtard, connu pour son cycle inversé, fleurit la nuit en libérant des senteurs de  « paquet de cigarettes vide » puis se referme le jour. Selon les clichés nocturnes du Rock-and-Roll, la fleur se cachera pendant les heures d’ouverture de la galerie.

Au centre de l’espace, se trouve une large structure en métal qui soutient des panneaux de vitraux Tiffany. Enluminant le texte de la pochette de Dirty Songs, la sculpture se lit comme une poésie concrète et nébuleuse.

Even after they had fallen silent in the twinkling
blue velvet of night, faint signals could be heard
from distant stars: dirty planet, we gotta go.

Les vitraux à l’esthétique psychédélique et op-art projettent dans la salle des nuances de bleu et de violet faisant écho aux nuanciers des données sur l’orgasme que nous entendons inconsciemment. Exposée idéalement au coeur de l’hiver, les teintes sélectionnées atténueraient le trouble affectif saisonnier (en anglais, SAD : Seasonal Affective Disorder).

L’exposition de Maxime Rossi est une expérience sensuelle intense et chargée, que la contre-culture transforme en trip aigu. L’algorithme intensifiera dans le temps la complexité de ce collage musical, orchestrant un jeu de « cadavres exquis » joué par les plus importants participants underground de la période après-paix.

1 Déclarations de l’artiste, 2018
Ref Etienne Decroux : The Paper Canoe : A Guide to Theatre Anthropology de Eugenio Barba, 1994
2 Maxime Rossi artwork titled Dirty Songs, 2017. Audika Records (ASCP)
3-4 En conversation avec l’auteur, Décembre 2018
5 Johan Kugelberg, “Barbara Rubin: Christmas on Earth”. The Brooklyn Rail. 5 février, 2013 https://brooklynrail.org/2013/02/artseen/barbara-rubin-christmas-on-earth
6 Klarl, Joseph. “Barbara Rubin: Christmas on Earth”. The Brooklyn Rail. 5 février, 2013. https://brooklynrail.org/2013/02/artseen/barbara-rubin-christmas-on-earth
7 https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0138361/?ref_=adv_li_tt


Credits:
-- Sound: DIRTY SONGS is: Phil Minton - voices; Evan Parker - tenor and soprano saxophones; Steve Beresford - Farfisa organ, VSC3 synth; Mark Sanders - drums; David Toop - bass, guitar, digital electronics, VSC3 synth; Design and artwork - Tom Recchion; Produced by David Toop with Dave Hunt; Executive producer - Maxime Rossi; Published by Audika Records (ASCP), Administred by Domino Publishing Co, Ltd. Programming: Benjamin Maus. Voice synthetisation & Artificial intelligence: Pierre Lanchantin. With help from the MRAC, Musée régional d'art contemporain Occitanie / Pyrénées-Méditerranée.
-- Stained glass : Graphic design, Atelier Pierre Pierre; Stained glass, Ateliers Duchemin; Words, David Toop; Technical drawing, Tiia Antilla; Steel structure, Ronan Masson.
-- Wall paper: Graphic design, Catalogue Général; Words from Christmas on Earth Continued, Barbara Rubin.
-- Prisms: 3D design, Atelier Pierre Pierre; 3D milling, Archtektur Modelle Berlin; Electronics, Benjamin maus. With help from the Fiminco Foundation.
-- Video: Directed by Maxime Rossi and Clemens Habicht, Shot by Martin Testar.)

Photography: Aurélien Mole